Digital Content: Curation vs. Creation

The world of digital content is changing on a daily basis, according to Scott Rogerson of UpContent in Pittsburgh, who spoke at the chapter’s February meeting.

“The arenas of owned, paid and earned media now include the segment of shared media,” he said.  The number of web sites has increased phenomenally and Rogerson said researchers have discovered that gold fish now have a longer attention span than humans do.  “This means we need to move back to true story telling and sharing our own unique perspective,” he said.

He defined curation and creation:

  • Curators link to third-party information 75% or more of the time;
  • Balanced content links to third-party information 50-75% of the time; and
  • Self-promoters link to owned media 50% or more of the time.

He said research shows that balanced content has the best conversion per post.  As with any communication, he said you must utilize planning and develop processes.  Rogerson also said remarketing costs can be lower than paid marketing.

“Curation isn’t aggravation,” he said.  On social media, you need to give your audience a content clue beyond the headline.  You need to use the FACE model of find, assess, curate and engage.

He also shared misconceptions about curation:

  1. It’s a replacement for engagement.
  2. It’s lazy and easy.
  3. It takes too much of your time.
  4. It’s unethical.
  5. It drives your audience away.

As he closed the discussion, he shared lumen5.com, a web site that coverts text to video (and even has a free version).

We would like to thank our meeting sponsor:

Congratulations to Beth White!

The American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) has announced that Beth A. White, executive director of the West Virginia Association for Justice, has earned the Certified Association Executive (CAE) designation. White is the first new CAE in West Virginia in more than 10 years. Just eight additional West Virginians hold the credential.

The CAE is the highest professional credential in the association industry. To be eligible, an applicant must have a minimum of three years experience with nonprofit organization management, complete a minimum of 100 hours of specialized professional development, pass a stringent association management examination and pledge to uphold a code of ethics.

“Every day I see the extraordinary work done by WVAJ’s attorney and paralegal members on behalf of West Virginia’s consumers, workers, and small business owners. It is a privilege to work with them, provide their practices with critical resources and help them protect access to our courts, the civil justice system and right to trial by jury,” said White.

“As WVAJ’s executive director, it was important for me to continue to develop professionally and help ensure that WVAJ grows and remains the best voluntary bar association that it can be.”

White has more than 20 years of experience in association management, public relations, political communications and campaigns, legislative and media advocacy, and program development. She was named executive director of the West Virginia Association for Justice in June 2005. She had worked with the association since 2003 as a political and media consultant. She earned an M.S. from the S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, with additional coursework in political communication at the university’s Maxwell School. She earned her undergraduate degree from West Virginia State University. In addition to her new designation as a CAE, she holds an accreditation in public relations (APR).

White is also a published historian and lecturer, focusing on U. S. history from the colonial period through the Civil War and U. S. political history. For more than a decade, she has studied and written on the history of trial by jury and the 7th Amendment, lecturing on the subject extensively to both state and national audiences. She has also written and lectured on West Virginia in the Civil War.